Home New mexico united Protesters gather in New Mexico amid protests in Iran

Protesters gather in New Mexico amid protests in Iran

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Several dozen people gathered at Old Town Plaza in Albuquerque on Saturday to support the Iranians. It comes after the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini, an Iranian woman detained in September 2022 in Iran for failing to adhere to the country’s dress code, which sparked outrage across the country. “That’s enough,” said demonstrator Tara Memarian. “Women are tired. Men are tired. They are tired of seeing their sisters, their wives, their mothers in such an oppressive regime, and so she was the figure of change. We need to be able to amplify their voice here” We need to send photos. We need to talk about their names.” Memarian said his family in Iran had been affected by the protests. “My whole family lives at home. I have grandparents there, my cousins, my uncles and aunts. My mother spoke to my grandmother every week by telegram, and now she can’t. It’s been a month or so that she hasn’t been able to contact her. Landlines no longer work. I think that’s the hardest thing. Not being able to know what’s going on, she said. in Iran. “It’s nonsense. You can wear whatever you want. That’s freedom. That’s what we have here in the United States. We want that for the people of Iran,” Pedram Roghanchi said. “Now what we can do from outside Iran is support our brothers and sisters who are on the streets trying to protect their rights. They are trying to claim their rights.” Hamrez Salehi, an Iranian, said she faced the same fate as Mahsa Amini of Iran’s vice police 25 years ago. “It was scary. A young girl alone, and then all the pressure and stress and anxiety they put on me. Mahsa Amini. It’s sad that this is happening. Nobody knows how much fear and of anger we carry in our hearts because of this dictator regime,” Salehi said. Other protesters expressed their support for women’s rights. “I am here for all women in Muslim-majority countries like me who must face the compulsory wearing of hijab, whether by the legal system or by social pressure,” said Dania Ammar. “I am here for women who want to cover their heads, who want to live fully in their bodies without their bodies not be used as a symbol of political power.” Despite weeks of unrest in Iran, protesters said they hoped their voices would be heard across the country in hopes of change.

Several dozen people gathered at Old Town Plaza in Albuquerque on Saturday to support the Iranians.

It comes after the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini, an Iranian woman detained in September 2022 in Iran for failing to adhere to the country’s dress code, which sparked outrage across the country.

“That’s enough,” said demonstrator Tara Memarian. “Women are tired. Men are tired. They are tired of seeing their sisters, their wives, their mothers in such an oppressive regime, and so she was the figure of change. We need to be able to amplify their voices here. We need to send the photos, we have to talk about their names.

Memarian said his family in Iran had been affected by the protests.

“My whole family lives at home. I have grandparents there, my cousins, my uncles and aunts. My mother spoke to my grandmother every week by telegram, and now she can’t. It’s been a month or so she hasn’t been able to contact her. The landlines don’t work anymore. I think that’s the hardest thing. Not being able to know what’s going on,” she said. declared.

Another protester stressed the importance of the need for freedom in Iran.

“It’s nonsense. You can wear whatever you want. That’s freedom. That’s what we have here in the United States. We want that for the people of Iran,” Pedram Roghanchi said. “Now what we can do from outside Iran is support our brothers and sisters who are on the streets trying to protect their rights. They are trying to win their rights.”

Hamrez Salehi, an Iranian, said she suffered the same fate as Mahsa Amini of Iran’s vice police 25 years ago.

“It was scary. A young girl alone and then all the pressure and stress and anxiety they put on me. Now after 25 years I see this happening to Mahsa Amini. It’s sad that No one knows how much fear and how much anger we carry in our hearts because of this dictator regime,” Salehi said.

Other protesters expressed their support for women’s rights.

“I am here for all women in Muslim-majority countries like me who have to deal with compulsory hijab wearing, whether through the legal system or social pressure,” said Dania Ammar. “I’m here for women who want to cover their heads, who want to live fully in their bodies without their bodies being used as a token of political power.”

Despite weeks of unrest in Iran, protesters said they hoped their voices would be heard across the country in hopes of change.