Home New mexico state New Mexico suffragette to be featured on American Women Quarters

New Mexico suffragette to be featured on American Women Quarters

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New Mexico’s history is rooted in a diverse culture and one woman, Adelina “Nina” Otero Warren, is a perfect example. KOAT spoke to New Mexico State Historian Rob Martinez, he said that Otero-Warren “came from a family that was for New Mexico high society. So she had this baggage of economic strength and political awareness going back generations in her family. She began her education at an early age in Albuquerque, then continued her education in St. Louis, Missouri. Eventually, she moved with her mother and family to Santa Fe. Martinez said, “Women have played a very important role in our history and Nina, as she is known, is definitely a major player in that history. ” In 1908, Otero-Warren married Rawson Warren. Two years later, she was divorced, moved back to Santa Fe, and called herself a widow because divorce was frowned upon. Otero-Warren was an important figure in the movement for female suffrage in the women’s movement in the early 1900s. She was also the first female superintendent of the Santa Fe Public Schools, one of the schools that now bears her name. Martinez said: “He was a unique person in his time.” Now, over 100 years later, her face and her legacy will be on our quarters of American women. It will also be the first quarter with the Spanish language saying “Voto para la mujer” which means “vote for women”. Mexico, Martinez said.

New Mexico’s history is rooted in a diverse culture and one woman, Adelina “Nina” Otero Warren, is a perfect example.

KOAT spoke to New Mexico State Historian Rob Martinez, he said that Otero-Warren “came from a family that was for New Mexico high society. So she had this baggage of economic strength and political awareness going back generations in her family.

She began her education at an early age in Albuquerque, then continued her education in St. Louis, Missouri. Eventually, she moved with her mother and family to Santa Fe.

Martinez said, “Women have played a very important role in our history and Nina, as she is known, is definitely a major player in that history.”

In 1908, Otero-Warren married Rawson Warren. Two years later, she was divorced, moved back to Santa Fe, and called herself a widow because divorce was frowned upon.

Otero-Warren was an important figure in the movement for female suffrage in the women’s movement in the early 1900s. She was also the first female superintendent of the Santa Fe Public Schools, one of the schools that now bears her name.

Martinez said: “He was a unique person in his time.”

Now, over 100 years later, his face and his legacy will be on our American women’s quarters. It will also be the first quarter with the Spanish language saying “Voto para la mujer” which means “vote for women”.

“I think it’s a great way to get people to learn about her, about the women in history, and about New Mexico,” Martinez said.