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First Afro-Latinx festival held in New Mexico

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An Albuquerque organization provides a new opportunity to learn about different cultures. On Sunday, AfroMundo hosted the second event of its Afro Latinx festival. The week-long series of bilingual events is the first celebration of its kind in New Mexico. “It makes sense to people when they hear ‘American.’ We can be any color, any race, but people use Bolivian or Colombian as if it’s a race, and Also, Afro-Latinos have been invisible,” said Loida Martiza Pérez, founder of AfroMundo. According to the Pew Research Center, a quarter of all Latinos in the United States identify as Afro-Latino. Yet, people like Pérez always feel left out in discussions of race and ethnicity.”We’ve been here,” she says. “Up until the founding of New Mexico and before, and we’ve been to every nation in the Americas before any of those nations became.” That’s why his organization, AfroMundo, hopes to change the narrative. The collective group is made up of members from all cultural backgrounds. “There are had so much anti-Asian violence, and so to be included in something like this is just welcoming reading all kinds of people is so essential right now. I think for people from all walks of life,” AfroMundo member Barbara Tran said. From concerts to literary readings, topics range from different voices inside and outside the New Mexico. Belinda Deneen Wallace, a participant in the event, said she was more than ready to learn. “I think the stigma just comes with the value, or lack thereof, that people have.” she said. “So the lack of knowledge, the lack of familiarity, leads to this kind of stigma, and quite frankly, to misinformation.” The group hopes to organize a similar event next year, with the mission to educate others and change future generations.” This is important to all Latinos. Having this community and the more we talk about it, the dialogue will expand to our children, our grandchildren and hopefully have a multi-generational impact, Pérez said. The events will run until Saturday, April 23, the most of them are located at the National Hispanic Cultural Center. All are open to the public and most are free. To check their schedule, visit the AfroMundo website here.

An Albuquerque organization provides a new opportunity to learn about different cultures.

On Sunday, AfroMundo hosted the second event of its Afro Latinx Festival.

The week-long series of bilingual events is the first celebration of its kind in New Mexico.

“It makes sense to people when they hear ‘American’. We can be any color [or] any race, but people use Bolivian or Colombian as a race, and [it’s not]. Also, Afro-Latinos have been invisible,” said Loida Martiza Pérez, founder of AfroMundo.

According to the Pew Research Center, a quarter of all Latinos in the United States identify as Afro-Latino.

Yet people like Pérez still feel left out in discussions of race and ethnicity.

“We’ve been here,” she said. “At the founding of New Mexico and before, and we’ve been in all the nations of the Americas before any of these nations became.”

That’s why his organization, AfroMundo, hopes to change the narrative.

The collective group is made up of members from all cultural backgrounds.

“There’s been so much anti-Asian violence, and so being included in something like this is just welcoming all kinds of people is so essential right now. I think for people from all walks of life,” Barbara Tran, a member of AfroMundo, said.

From concerts to literary readings, topics range from different voices inside and outside the New Mexico community.

Dr. Belinda Deneen Wallace, a participant in the event, said she was more than ready to learn.

“I think the stigma just comes from the value, or lack thereof, that people have,” she said. “So the lack of knowledge, the lack of familiarity, leads to that kind of stigma, and quite frankly, misinformation.”

The group hopes to hold a similar event next year, with a mission to educate others and change future generations.

“It’s important for all Latinos. Having this community and the more we talk about it, the dialogue will expand to our children, our grandchildren and hopefully have a multi-generational impact,” Pérez said.

The events will run through Saturday, April 23, with most of them located at the National Hispanic Cultural Center.

All are open to the public and most are free.

To consult their schedule, go to the AfroMundo website here.