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Albuquerque neighborhoods worried about the city’s football stadium project

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Residents of some historic neighborhoods in Albuquerque have spoken out against the city’s proposed football stadium. The $ 50 million bond for the multi-purpose facility will be on the ballot for thousands of people on Tuesday, November 2. “This initiative with the stadium would be something that would be of real benefit to the community,” Cindy Naba, consultant for the “New Mexico United for All” campaign, she added. She added that she was excited about an increase in tourism and employment. noted. “It’s a start for innovation.” However, not all residents agree. On October 29, the Historic Neighborhoods Alliance held a rally to voice concerns about the proposed stadium. The group consists of a collection of neighbors from South Broadway, Barelas, Santa Barbara Martineztown, Wells Park and San Jose. “We’re old historic neighborhoods and we’re often slated for development that really doesn’t fit,” said Diana Dorn-Jones, who lives on South Broadway. Dorn-Jones added that the football stadium would be too big for their smaller, quaint neighborhoods. The proposed facility could also cause problems, such as the Albuquerque rail yards. “The people on the west side of our neighborhood, closest to the rail yard, can’t sleep at night when these concerts are taking place,” said Dorn-Jones. “Their windows are shaking and there is a lot of traffic. We are concerned about this.” Bianca Encinias has lived in Wells Park for 15 years. “I love our community. I always wanted to live there since I was little, I grew up in the South Valley. I always considered it a dream to be in town,” said Encinias. community, she is also concerned about the problems that the proposed football stadium could bring. “There is no traffic study that has been done,” Encinias said. “There hasn’t been a noise study to see what kind of impacts noise and traffic jams will create.” Especially in historic neighborhoods where African Americans and Hispanics often reside. “Communities of color have already been disproportionately affected, and we don’t understand why another major development project is being proposed for our communities,” Encinias said. Instead of the multi-purpose facility, the alliance focuses on increased neighborhood needs, such as housing rehabilitation for the elderly, permanent affordable housing, and financing for small businesses. “We want development that adapts. We want small business development. We want to have housing development and we want to have a place where our elderly, the elderly, can grow old in place,” said Dorn- Jones. All for the good of their own communities. Just in time for election day. “Think about our little neighborhoods and what we’re trying to do, and vote ‘no’ on the stadium,” Dorn-Jones said. Residents added that despite the official vote result, they will continue to work with Albuquerque city officials on what they want to see in their own neighborhoods. KOAT has contacted New Mexico United officials for an interview or statement. They declined our request.

Residents of some historic neighborhoods in Albuquerque have spoken out against the city’s proposed football stadium.

The $ 50 million bond for the multi-purpose facility will be on the ballot for thousands of people on Tuesday, November 2.

“This initiative with the stadium would be something that would be of real benefit to the community,” said Cindy Naba, consultant for the “New Mexico United For All” campaign.

She added that she was excited about an increase in tourism and employment.

“Job creation, right? And clearly, you know, travel and more tourism is coming to the state,” Naba said. “It’s a start for innovation.”

However, not all locals agree.

On October 29, the Historic Neighborhoods Alliance held a rally to voice concerns about the proposed stadium. The group consists of a collection of neighbors from South Broadway, Barelas, Santa Barbara Martineztown, Wells Park and San Jose.

“We’re old historic neighborhoods and we’re often slated for development that really doesn’t fit,” said Diana Dorn-Jones, who lives on South Broadway.

Dorn-Jones added that the football stadium would be too big for their smaller, quaint neighborhoods.

The proposed facility could also cause problems, such as the Albuquerque rail yards.

“The people on the west side of our neighborhood, closest to the rail yard, can’t sleep at night when these concerts are taking place,” said Dorn-Jones. “Their windows are shaking and there is a lot of traffic. This concerns us. “

Bianca Encinias has lived in Wells Park for 15 years.

“I love our community. I always wanted to live there since I was little, I grew up in the South Valley. I always considered it a dream to be in town,” said Encinias.

Like other members of her community, she is also concerned about the problems that the proposed football stadium could cause.

“There is no traffic study that has been done,” Encinias said. “There hasn’t been a noise study to see what kind of impacts noise and traffic jams will create.”

Especially in historic neighborhoods where African Americans and Hispanics often reside.

“Communities of color have already been disproportionately affected, and we don’t understand why another major development project is being proposed for our communities,” Encinias said.

Instead of the multi-purpose facility, the alliance focuses on increased neighborhood needs, such as housing rehabilitation for the elderly, permanent affordable housing, and financing for small businesses.

“We want development that adapts. We want small business development. We want to have housing development and we want to have a place where our elderly, the elderly, can grow old in place,” said Dorn- Jones.

All for the good of their own communities.

Just in time for election day.

“Think about our little neighborhoods and what we’re trying to do, and vote ‘no’ on the stadium,” Dorn-Jones said.

Residents added that despite the official vote result, they will continue to work with Albuquerque city officials on what they want to see in their own neighborhoods.

KOAT has contacted New Mexico United officials for an interview or statement. They declined our request.


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